Cable lobby conducts survey, finds that Americans want net neutrality

Cable lobby conducts survey, finds that Americans want net neutrality:

news-queue:

As US cable companies push to eliminate or change net neutrality rules, the industry’s primary lobby group today released the results of a survey that it says shows “strong bipartisan consensus that the government should let the Internet flourish without imposing burdensome regulations.”

But proponents of keeping the current rules can find plenty to like in the survey conducted by NCTA—The Internet & Television Association. A strong majority of the 2,194 registered American voters in the survey support the current net neutrality rules that prohibit ISPs from blocking, throttling, or prioritizing online content in exchange for payment. While most opposed price regulation, a majority supported an approach in which regulators take action against ISPs on a case-by-case basis when consumers are harmed—the exact same approach the Federal Communications Commission uses under its existing net neutrality regime.

Full results of the NCTA survey conducted with Morning Consult are available here.

About 61 percent of respondents either “strongly” or “somewhat” support net neutrality rules that say ISPs “cannot block, throttle, or prioritize certain content on the Internet.” Only 18 percent oppose net neutrality, as the rest don’t know what it is or had no opinion.

Technically, this doesn’t contradict the official position of major cable companies like Comcast and Charter. These companies say they support the core net neutrality rules, while merely opposing the FCC’s use of its common carrier authority under Title II of the Communications Act to enforce them. But the net neutrality rules imposed in 2015 depend on Title II because of a 2014 court decision that prevented the FCC from enforcing the rules without reclassifying ISPs as Title II common carriers.

Support for protecting consumers

The first slide in the NCTA survey results trumpets broad support for “light touch” regulation. But instead of signaling broad opposition to Title II, the wording of the question shows that Americans support an approach that’s consistent with the one taken by the FCC’s then-Democratic leadership in 2015 (and which the FCC’s current Republican leadership wants to overturn).

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FCC halts public comments on Net Neutrality

mostlysignssomeportents:

After hearing from so many angry Americans who wanted to preserve net neutrality rules that they had to invent a seemingly fictional “denial of service” attack to explain their servers melting down, the FCC has solved the problem by telling the public to go fuck themselves.

The FCC will no longer accept public comments on Net Neutrality, while it “reflects” on the comments it’s received.

You can still tell the FCC what you think by posting to EFF’s DearFCC.org site – EFF will make sure the commissioners get your comments.

https://boingboing.net/2017/05/15/a-banana-in-my-ear.html

you are about to lose your access to the internet.

fullhalalalchemist:

right now, you are able to access everything on the internet, correct? it’s not like cable tv, where you’re forced to pay a company to only give you a limited range of shitty tv shows bombarded with shitty commercials all for an expensive and unfair deal.

the internet is about to be exactly like that. everything, from accessing sites like Tumblr to ao3, to seeing your financial aid packet online, to googling dumb shit on wikipedia, to laughing at internet memes, to streaming things online, all of that is because the internet is open and free. and it is all about to be taken away from you. you are about to lose your net neutrality.

do not understand net neutrality? here is a handy guide. here is also a john oliver segment describing everything.

here is what you can do to stop it:

-submit your comment to the fcc here. click on + Express, fill out your info, and tell the FCC not to repeal Net Neutrality rules. Tell Ajit Pai to support Net Neutrality backed by title 2 oversight on ISPs. make your comment personal.

YOU. MUST. SUBMIT. A. COMMENT. this is the most IMPORTANT part!! public comments close on MAY 11. we don’t have much time to save the internet!

-FCC Hotline: 1-888-225-5322

-here are petitions you can sign

-call your representatives. urge them to pressure the FCC not to remove the Titile 2 oversight on ISPs.

PUBLIC COMMENTS CLOSE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 11. WE HAVE TWO DAYS TO COMPLETELY FLOOD THE COMMENTS. THIS IS URGENT.

please spread! send this to all your mutuals! spam your blogs! send this to all your friends on facebook, on twitter, reddit, on anything and everything! email your mom! idc! just get as many people as you can to submit a comment!!

you are about to lose your access to the internet.

fullhalalalchemist:

right now, you are able to access everything on the internet, correct? it’s not like cable tv, where you’re forced to pay a company to only give you a limited range of shitty tv shows bombarded with shitty commercials all for an expensive and unfair deal.

the internet is about to be exactly like that. everything, from accessing sites like Tumblr to ao3, to seeing your financial aid packet online, to googling dumb shit on wikipedia, to laughing at internet memes, to streaming things online, all of that is because the internet is open and free. and it is all about to be taken away from you. you are about to lose your net neutrality.

do not understand net neutrality? here is a handy guide. here is also a john oliver segment describing everything.

here is what you can do to stop it:

-submit your comment to the fcc here. click on + Express, fill out your info, and tell the FCC not to repeal Net Neutrality rules. Tell Ajit Pai to support Net Neutrality backed by title 2 oversight on ISPs. make your comment personal.

YOU. MUST. SUBMIT. A. COMMENT. this is the most IMPORTANT part!! public comments close on MAY 11. we don’t have much time to save the internet!

-FCC Hotline: 1-888-225-5322

-here are petitions you can sign

-call your representatives. urge them to pressure the FCC not to remove the Titile 2 oversight on ISPs.

PUBLIC COMMENTS CLOSE THIS THURSDAY, MAY 11. WE HAVE TWO DAYS TO COMPLETELY FLOOD THE COMMENTS. THIS IS URGENT.

please spread! send this to all your mutuals! spam your blogs! send this to all your friends on facebook, on twitter, reddit, on anything and everything! email your mom! idc! just get as many people as you can to submit a comment!!

izanzanwin: Settlers deny that they desecrate sacred remains….







izanzanwin:

Settlers deny that they desecrate sacred remains. They deny the violence that happened at Standing Rock, and now they continue to desecrate and destroy the sacred sites. Please signal boost, call, get the word out that this is happening. Colonialism is still ongoing, never forget.

kedreeva: amy-reblogs: thistherapylife: sandalwoodandsunlight:…













kedreeva:

amy-reblogs:

thistherapylife:

sandalwoodandsunlight:

FCC HOTLINE: 1-888-225-5322

CALL

Hey American friends, so much Internet stuff happens in America that if this passes, it will affect everyone. PLEASE DO SOMETHING.

Okay, so like, I called the hotline, and it’s a bunch of menu options that are not exactly intuitive, and I couldn’t seem to get in touch with an actual operator BUT. Good news. I did eventually go far enough down the rabbit hole to be directed to their consumer complaint website.

Here you can click on “Tell your story” and voice your concerns to the FCC. From the site:

When you have issues concerning a provider or policy, let us know about it. By submitting your story you are NOT filing a consumer complaint. Your story won’t be forwarded to your provider and you will not hear back from your provider or the FCC. We will share your story internally and use it to inform policy making and potential enforcement activities.

By filing a consumer complaint and telling your story, you contribute to federal enforcement and consumer protection efforts on a national scale and help us identify trends and track the issues that matter most.

So, this seems like a likely alternative to calling (and was the recommendation when I DID call), which is cool because I know how much anxiety calling places gives people. Go forth and type away, friends! Help protect net neutrality!