ivan-fyodorovich: I always thought that Google’s informal motto…







ivan-fyodorovich:

I always thought that Google’s informal motto being “don’t be evil” was about as comforting as a coworker having a sign at his cubicle reminding him not to snap and murder everyone in the building. 

As it turns out, watching the coworker remove the sign is even more ominous.

sauvamente: I just feel like if you buy Alexa or echo or any of those other Amazon home devices that…

sauvamente:

 I just feel like if you buy Alexa or echo or any of those other Amazon home devices that you deserve whatever you get if it decides to start laughing in the middle of the night you did that to yourself nobody told you to buy a semi-sentient electronic you did that it’s your fault

doubletranquility: wild how women who use the internet a lot are shamed for using their phones and…

doubletranquility:

wild how women who use the internet a lot are shamed for using their phones and being self centered and taking selfies or whatever when men use the internet to basically unlearn empathy and become nazis and terrorists

#5yrsago Black Code: how spies, cops and crims are making cyberspace unfit for human habitation

mostlysignssomeportents:

I reviewed Ronald Diebert’s new book Black Code in this weekend’s edition of the Globe and Mail. Diebert runs the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto and has been instrumental in several high-profile reports that outed government spying (like Chinese hackers who compromised the Dalai Lama’s computer and turned it into a covert CCTV) and massive criminal hacks (like the Koobface extortion racket). His book is an amazing account of how cops, spies and crooks all treat the Internet as the same kind of thing: a tool for getting information out of people without their knowledge or consent, and how they end up in a kind of emergent conspiracy to erode the net’s security to further their own ends. It’s an absolutely brilliant and important book:

Ronald Deibert’s new book, Black Code, is a gripping and absolutely terrifying blow-by-blow account of the way that companies, governments, cops and crooks have entered into an accidental conspiracy to poison our collective digital water supply in ways small and large, treating the Internet as a way to make a quick and dirty buck or as a snoopy spy’s best friend. The book is so thoroughly disheartening for its first 14 chapters that I found myself growing impatient with it, worrying that it was a mere counsel of despair.

But the final chapter of Black Code is an incandescent call to arms demanding that states and their agents cease their depraved indifference to the unintended consequences of their online war games and join with civil society groups that work to make the networked society into a freer, better place than the world it has overwritten.

Deibert is the founder and director of The Citizen Lab, a unique institution at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. It is one part X-Files hacker clubhouse, one part computer science lab and one part international relations observatory. The Citizen Lab’s researchers have scored a string of international coups: Uncovering GhostNet, the group of Chinese hackers taking over sensitive diplomatic computers around the world and eavesdropping on the private lives of governments; cracking Koobface, a group of Russian petty crooks who extorted millions from random people on the Internet, a few hundred dollars at a time; exposing another Chinese attack directed at the Tibetan government in exile and the Dalai Lama. Each of these exploits is beautifully recounted in Black Code and used to frame a larger, vivid narrative of a network that is global, vital and terribly fragile.

Yes, fragile. The value of the Internet to us as a species is incalculable, but there are plenty of parties for whom the Internet’s value increases when it is selectively broken.


How to make cyberspace safe for human habitation

Black Code: Inside the Battle for Cyberspace

https://boingboing.net/2013/05/18/black-code-how-spies.html

thechanelmuse: Black Twitter Drags New Black Celebs One of the…





















thechanelmuse:

Black Twitter Drags New Black Celebs

One of the first and most influential users of the tag, #BlackCelebsBeLike, was Zellie Imani, an activist and blogger behind the website black-culture. “The goal really was to challenge the pedestal we sometimes put celebrities on and not to allow media to use them as spokespersons for [all] black people,” he tells BBC Trending via email.

Imani mentioned the remarks by Common and Terrence Howard. “I was surprised that the hashtag took off so fast but i wasn’t surprised at how many people felt about the issue,” he says. “Celebrities experience racism and discrimination even when they are in denial of its existence. Denying racism doesn’t make it exist any less.”

wizardshark: justanotheridijiton: superbrybread: chescaleigh: robtromboning: let me demonstrate…

wizardshark:

justanotheridijiton:

superbrybread:

chescaleigh:

robtromboning:

let me demonstrate my point wrt doctoring social media using my twitter

image

here’s my original tweet here

if i right click and click “inspect element” on chrome and find the line that says my actual tweet like so

image

and select that line, right click, and click “edit as html”

image

I can type in whatever i want like this

image

and like that i can make a screenshot that says that i like to eat children and use it to call myself out

image

and thats why you should’t believe screenshots of tweets at face value w/o a link to the original tweet

this is terrifying

this is terrifying because no matter how many notes this post gets, people on tumblr still don’t think about sources

See also:

Feldman, Brian. (2015, Dec 11). “It Is Incredibly Easy to Fake a Screenshot. Here’s How” http://nymag.com/selectall/2015/11/how-to-fake-a-screenshot.html

guys op is really problematic i heard they eat children :/