New law to predict future Black criminality | New Pittsburgh Courier

New law to predict future Black criminality | New Pittsburgh Courier:

“Pennsylvania is considering the implementation of a computer program designed to predict future criminality, thereby determining what type of sentence a judge should impose. But talented attorneys like veteran trial lawyer Troy H. Wilson are not having any of that.”

Tanzania’s latest clampdown takes decades of repression to new lows

Tanzania's latest clampdown takes decades of repression to new lows:

“The law means that anyone who posts a blog or is active on social media, or runs an online platform, will have to pay for a licence to keep their sites running. These licences cost around US$900 and can be revoked if the content of the site is deemed to threaten public order and national security. Users potentially face 12 months in prison, or a fine of up to US$2300. This, in a country in which GDP per capita is US$877.50.”

newyorker: Susan Kare, The Woman Who Gave the Macintosh a…







newyorker:

Susan Kare, The Woman Who Gave the Macintosh a Smile

In 1982, she was a sculptor and sometime curator when her high-school friend Andy Hertzfeld asked her to create graphics for a new computer that he was working on in California. Kare brought a Grid notebook to her job interview at Apple Computer. On its pages, she had sketched, in pink marker, a series of icons to represent the commands that Hertzfeld’s software would execute. Each square represented a pixel. A pointing finger meant “Paste.” A paintbrush symbolized “MacPaint.” Scissors said “Cut.” Kare told me about this origin moment: “As soon as I started work, Andy Hertzfeld wrote an icon editor and font editor so I could design images and letterforms using the Mac, not paper,” she said. “But I loved the puzzle-like nature of working in sixteen-by-sixteen and thirty-two-by-thirty-twopixel icon grids, and the marriage of craft and metaphor.”

Read more about Susan Kare

Black Twitter – Informed and Engaged – Medium

Black Twitter – Informed and Engaged – Medium:

Each section details how use and amplification of tweets without proper context have damaged relationships between media and diverse communities. Each section also reflects a collective desire for journalists to develop meaningful relationships within the online communities they cover, learning its norms, language, practices and values….

Book Forum on Alondra Nelson’s The Social Life of DNA | Somatosphere

jmjafrx:

A thing I’m excited to be a part of! Read our essays below:

In The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome, Alondra Nelson traces the multiple ways in which genetic testing and related technologies have become entangled in contemporary debates, projects, politics, and interventions surrounding race in the United States.  This wide-ranging and incisive book manages the difficult task of being a key addition to the scholarly literatures on race, science, and society, at the same time as it reaches out to broader, non-specialist audiences.  We are very happy to offer the following commentaries on this important book.

The Big Reveal, Thoughts on The Social Life of DNA
Arlene Dávila
New York University

“Are These the Bones of Blacks?” An African American Social Construction of Justice
Jessica Marie Johnson
Johns Hopkins University

Molecular Biological Ambivalences
Stephan Palmié
The University of Chicago

Genetic Ancestry as an Optic: Reconciliation Revisioned, Diaspora Revived
Noah Tamarkin
The Ohio State University

Read: Book forum — Alondra Nelson’s The Social Life of DNA | Somatosphere



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