Black Code (co-edited by @jmjafrx and @NewBlackMan)

jmjafrx:

Delighted to share the latest special issue of the Black Scholar on the convergence of black studies and the digital humanities known as Black Code Studies–co-edited by Mark Anthony Neal and yours truly!

See below:

The Black Scholar is proud to announce the release of “Black Code,” a special issue of the Black Scholar. The guest editors, Jessica Marie Johnson and Mark Anthony Neal, have assembled a collective of digital soothsayers working on the margins of Black Studies, Afrofuturism, radical media, and the digital humanities. Black Code Studies is queer, femme, fugitive, and radical; as praxis and methodology, it waxes insurgent when the need arises. And in this moment, we are in need of Black digital insurgency, one attuned to racial scripts of the past even as it looks to future modes of Black thought and cultural production for inspiration. Barely scratching the surface, this issue welcomes new work and celebrates a Black digital fugitivity that has been present since the beginning of the internet. Our contributors include Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Lauren Cramer, Alessandra Raengo, Tara L. Conley, Ashleigh Wade, Aleia Brown, Joshua Crutchfield, Megan Driscoll, Ahmad Greene-Hayes, and Joy James, with an introduction from Jessica Marie Johnson and Mark Anthony Neal, and cover art from John Jennings celebrating Octavia Butler’s iconic novel Wild Seed.

Preview the introduction by Johnson and Neal, the co-editors, by following this link:
http://ift.tt/Jvceu6toc/rtbs20/47/3?nav=tocList

We hope you enjoy the work as much as we enjoyed bringing this phenomenal group of scholars together! Hurray! It’s here!!!

___

Jessica Marie Johnson is Assistant Professor of Africana Studies + History at Johns Hopkins University. Her work appears in Slavery & Abolition, The Black Scholar, Meridians: Feminism, Race and Transnationalism, and Debates in the Digital Humanities. Her research is on Atlantic slavery and diaspora, with a focus on women, gender, and sexuality. Contact: jmjohnso@gmail.com, @jmjafrx on Twitter.

Mark Anthony Neal is Professor of African + African-American Studies and English at Duke University, and the author of several including books Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic and Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities. Neal directs the Center for Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship. Contact: dr-yogi@att.net, @NewBlackMan on Twitter.



via Diaspora Hypertext, the Blog http://ift.tt/2wmQaxI

“Blackness is a technology in and of itself. The way we survive and thrive has always been contingent…”

“Blackness is a technology in and of itself. The way we survive and thrive has always been contingent on building technologies against the system that sets us up to fail.”

- Kimberly Drew, Founder of @blackcontemporaryart in The Lenny Interview: Kimberly Drew, aka @MuseumMammy​​ with Doreen St. Felix (via blackcontemporaryart)

instagram: Celebrating One Year of Instagram Stories Video by…



instagram:

Celebrating One Year of Instagram Stories

Video by @100Soft on Instagram.

A year ago today, we brought stories to Instagram and quickly saw a shift in how people share their everyday experiences with their friends and followers. Our community had an entirely new way of sharing not just life’s highlights, but the in-between moments that bring us closer. Your stories have brought us behind the scenes, from your dog’s terrible haircut to videos from last night’s concert. Thanks to our growing community of 250 million who are sharing these experiences with us every day!

“Renina Jarmon’s Black Girls Are From the Future captures the spirit of black feminist theorizing in…”

“Renina Jarmon’s Black Girls Are From the Future captures the spirit of black feminist theorizing in what will certainly come to be known as the “early age” of social media. Further, it enacts an important blurring of hard and digital pages as we work through questions of what does and does not constitute intellectual labor and how we own our labor, our production, in a marketplace and space in constant flux. Finally, Black Girls Are From the Future reminds us of the continuing significance of cultural criticism as a tool with which we can speak back from the margins, theorize our own potential and possibilities, and imagine a freedom that subverts the violence we currently and perpetually experience.”

-

Dr. Zandria Robinson Reviews  my Book, Black Girls Are From the Future.

Take that, take that, take that. I can’t even read this entire thing ya’ll. It makes me want to shmoney Dance.

Buy your copy here.

Good Reads Reviews Here.

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

browngirlsgang: EQUALITY LABS IS THE FIRST SOUTH ASIAN…



browngirlsgang:

EQUALITY LABS IS THE FIRST SOUTH ASIAN WOMEN/GENDER NON-CONFORMING/TRANS TECHNOLOGY STARTUP

EQUALITY LABS IS A SOUTH ASIAN AMERICAN HUMAN RIGHTS START-UP WORKING AT THE INTERSECTION OF STORY, ART, AND SECURITY. WE SUPPORT MOVEMENTS DEALING WITH INTRACTABLE SYSTEMS OF OPPRESSION THROUGH A COLLABORATIVE MODEL THAT CONNECTS MULTIPLE DISCIPLINES AND PLATFORMS TO MAXIMIZE POTENTIAL FOR CHANGE AND ENGENDER WORKABLE, COMMUNITY DRIVEN SOLUTIONS TO THE MOST PRESSING CHALLENGES WE FACE. WE ARE ALSO THE FIRST SOUTH WOMEN, GENDER NON CONFORMING, AND TRANS TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIVE WHOSE LEADERSHIP IS FROM SOUTH ASIAN CULTURAL AND RELIGIOUS MINORITY COMMUNITIES. THIS INCLUDES DALITS,  ADIVASIS, MUSLIMS, BUDDHISTS, AND CHRISTIANS.

Link