Epistolary Ennui: Digital Humanities Projects – History, Culture, Memory

Epistolary Ennui: Digital Humanities Projects - History, Culture, Memory:

epistolary-ennui:

Digital humanities projects are a recently revived interest of mine, in part from an article I read: Alan Liu & William Thomas, ‘Humanities in the Digital Age’.

Combining aesthetic and functional presentation with well researched information (either digitally born or represented digitally) is…

Sample Syllabus: Introduction to Digital Humanities

Sample Syllabus: Introduction to Digital Humanities:

jedi-master-mormont:

Professor Todd Presner of UCLA posted a sample syllabus for an Intro to DH course:

DH 201/Comp Lit 290 Graduate Seminar
Introduction to Digital Humanities 
Humanistic Knowledge, Disciplines, and Institutions in the 21st Century 


Course Description: The purpose of this graduate seminar is to introduce students to the key concepts, methods, theories, and emerging practices in the “Digital Humanities.” The seminar will provide a historical overview of the field from its beginnings in the post-World War II era to the present, highlighting the major intellectual problems, disciplinary paradigms, and institutional challenges that are posed by Digital Humanities. While we will proceed from a trans-disciplinary perspective and focus on the transformation of disciplines such as literature, history, geography, archaeology, among others, the seminar will ultimately consider “Digital Humanities” as a group of “knowledge problems” that affect what we know, how we know, and what we consider to be knowledge. We will examine the major epistemological, methodological, technological, and institutional challenges posed by the Digital Humanities through a number of specific projects that address fundamental problems in creating, interpreting, preserving, and transmitting the human cultural record. At the same time, we will examine how digital technologies and tools—ranging from mark-up languages and map visualizations to database structures and interface design—are themselves arguments that make certain assumptions about, and even transform, our objects of study. This is not a course in studying new media or the impact of digital technology on culture per se, but rather is focused on those areas where the Humanities intersect with digital tools for analysis and interpretation, and how we can bridge the gap between the traditions of critical theory and the practice-based approaches of the Digital Humanities.


This is a five-unit course broken down as follows:  4 units for weekly seminar meetings (3 hours/week) and 1 unit for tools workshops.  Students are required to attend at least four tools workshops over the quarter (scheduled for various days).  The workshops are organized by the Library and will focus on a wide-range of digital tools, methods, and technologies, including XML, TEI, GIS, and general research issues in the Digital Humanities such as copyright.  The schedule for the workshops can be found here: http://www.library.ucla.edu/service/6362.cfm  Graduate students may also audit DH 194 (in spring quarter) to satisfy the “lab” component of this class. 



Required Books:
Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge
Jerome McGann, Radiant Textuality: Literature after the World Wide Web [selections]
Johanna Drucker, SpecLab: Digital Aesthetics and Projects in Speculative Computing [selections]

Course-reader (TBA)

Grading Structure:
25% = Completion of weekly problem sets; participation in seminar and workshops
10% = Assignment #1
15% = Assignment #2
50% = Assignment #3 (draft is 25% and final written proposal is 25%)

CONFERENCE: Access, Competition and For-Profit Colleges

CONFERENCE: Access, Competition and For-Profit Colleges:

anothergirlontheirt:

I’m pleased to be organizing an AERA research conference, “Access, Competition, and For-Profit Colleges” in collaboration with Sandy Darity, The Research Network on Racial & Ethnic Inequality, and with generous support from the AERA Conference Grant.

This interdisciplinary two-day conference will convene September 21-22, 2012 at Duke University. You can register and learn more here.

This conference dovetails with my research on legitimacy, race, gender, and outcomes of for-profit higher education so I’m very excited.

The conference objectives  attend to three major goals: a survey of existing for-profit literature, an analysis of major gaps in existing literature with an attention to methodological concerns in the study of for-profits; and, an agenda for proposed research on for-profits.

Scheduled panels include:

Mapping the For-profit Research Landscape

For-Profit Higher Education and The Social Good

Race, Class, and Gender: Who are For-profit students?

The Problem of Data: How to Study For-profits

Public Finance, Competition, and For-profits: Do The Means Justify The Ends?

Online Pedagogy, Social Media, and Representation in For-Profits

I’m particularly excited about the Emerging Scholarship panel. It includes papers on:

Tressie McMillan Cottom, Emory University  “Legitimacy and Mobility: When Becoming ‘Real College’ Is An Institutional Barrier”

Christine Tracy and Molly Kleinman, University of Michigan  “The Acquisition of Non-profit Colleges and Universities by For-profit Corporations in the United States”

Thomas Mays, University of Dayton  “Social Capital and For-profit Colleges”

Rohit Dutta Roy, Jadavpur University  “Privatization of Education in India and the Conflicts with Equity Objective: Should Higher Education be Seen as a Business for ‘Profit-Making”

I could not be more pleased with the engagement of scholars from across the disciplinary spectrum: Sara Goldrick-Rab, Jorge Klor De Alva, Mark Schneider, MaryBeth Gasman, Laura Perna, Kevin Kinser, Letitia Oseguera, Gaye Tuchman to name a few. Goldie Blumenstyk  and Victor Borden from CHE and IHE, respectively, will also be in the house.

We’re aiming to do nothing short of move the conversation about for-profit education forward to produce rigorous interdisciplinary research, theoretically grounded and publicly engaged on a topic that too often dissolves into polemics.

CONFERENCE: Access, Competition and For-Profit Colleges

CONFERENCE: Access, Competition and For-Profit Colleges:

anothergirlontheirt:

I’m pleased to be organizing an AERA research conference, “Access, Competition, and For-Profit Colleges” in collaboration with Sandy Darity, The Research Network on Racial & Ethnic Inequality, and with generous support from the AERA Conference Grant.

This interdisciplinary two-day conference will convene September 21-22, 2012 at Duke University. You can register and learn more here.

This conference dovetails with my research on legitimacy, race, gender, and outcomes of for-profit higher education so I’m very excited.

The conference objectives  attend to three major goals: a survey of existing for-profit literature, an analysis of major gaps in existing literature with an attention to methodological concerns in the study of for-profits; and, an agenda for proposed research on for-profits.

Scheduled panels include:

Mapping the For-profit Research Landscape

For-Profit Higher Education and The Social Good

Race, Class, and Gender: Who are For-profit students?

The Problem of Data: How to Study For-profits

Public Finance, Competition, and For-profits: Do The Means Justify The Ends?

Online Pedagogy, Social Media, and Representation in For-Profits

I’m particularly excited about the Emerging Scholarship panel. It includes papers on:

Tressie McMillan Cottom, Emory University  “Legitimacy and Mobility: When Becoming ‘Real College’ Is An Institutional Barrier”

Christine Tracy and Molly Kleinman, University of Michigan  “The Acquisition of Non-profit Colleges and Universities by For-profit Corporations in the United States”

Thomas Mays, University of Dayton  “Social Capital and For-profit Colleges”

Rohit Dutta Roy, Jadavpur University  “Privatization of Education in India and the Conflicts with Equity Objective: Should Higher Education be Seen as a Business for ‘Profit-Making”

I could not be more pleased with the engagement of scholars from across the disciplinary spectrum: Sara Goldrick-Rab, Jorge Klor De Alva, Mark Schneider, MaryBeth Gasman, Laura Perna, Kevin Kinser, Letitia Oseguera, Gaye Tuchman to name a few. Goldie Blumenstyk  and Victor Borden from CHE and IHE, respectively, will also be in the house.

We’re aiming to do nothing short of move the conversation about for-profit education forward to produce rigorous interdisciplinary research, theoretically grounded and publicly engaged on a topic that too often dissolves into polemics.