jasonmkelly: On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital…



jasonmkelly:

On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital Humanities and Digital History to a group of new Public History graduate students.  I’m assuming that they know little to nothing of digital humanities.  So, I thought that I would summarize what digital humanities looks like as a practice when graphed against developments in web technologies (with which I assume they are more familiar).  The graph is not meant to be definitive, nor is it meant to summarize my own views about the trajectory (good, bad, or otherwise) of DH.  Rather, it’s meant to summarize some predominant ideas in the field as well as to provide some avenues for reflection on the relationship technology and scholarship.  I would be very interested in any suggestions.  Thanks.  Jason.   

jasonmkelly: On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital…



jasonmkelly:

On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital Humanities and Digital History to a group of new Public History graduate students.  I’m assuming that they know little to nothing of digital humanities.  So, I thought that I would summarize what digital humanities looks like as a practice when graphed against developments in web technologies (with which I assume they are more familiar).  The graph is not meant to be definitive, nor is it meant to summarize my own views about the trajectory (good, bad, or otherwise) of DH.  Rather, it’s meant to summarize some predominant ideas in the field as well as to provide some avenues for reflection on the relationship technology and scholarship.  I would be very interested in any suggestions.  Thanks.  Jason.   

Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr

Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr:

teachingtotransform:

edshelf:

In terms of classroom application, Tumblr would be a good way for you to share research for projects and assignments. Your students could then follow your Tumblr site and ‘reblog’ items into their personal site.

Or you could have students create multimedia (photos, videos, etc.) and post them onto their Tumblr. Then you could see how many views, likes, and reblogs each one gets. Could be a great way to encourage social media usage in schools using a free web 2.0 tool.

Finally, you could use it to connect with other teachers and education professionals. After just a few Tumblr searches and posts, you’ll find that people start coming out of the woodwork to ‘like’ your content and share it. You can quickly find fellow teachers and education-y folks by simply searching keywords like ‘teacher’ ‘edtech’ and so forth. When you find some good content, be sure to like it and reblog it. That person will then check your site out, start following your Tumblr, etc. Before you know it, you’ll have a whole new PLN on Tumblr!

I’m still not convinced on the best way to use Tumblr in the classroom, but I love it for finding teaching tools, ideas, and other teachers.