Media Justice: Why Citations Matter (and how to do them properly w/virtual resources)

Media Justice: Why Citations Matter (and how to do them properly w/virtual resources):

latinegrasexologist:

You may want to bookmark this post for future reference. For many of you in school (high school, college, a vocational school) you are most likely going to be expected to write something. Each semester I have students write at least two papers, which is something that we are encouraged to do in an effort to support and expect students to be able to express themselves through writing. With all of the advances in technology, many folks are writing online. When you write, citations are important.

Citations are not just for the reader, but they are also for you, the writer and the folks whose work you find useful. These citations are so important; they shows you have done your research, are open to other perspectives, and can offer ways for the reader to go back and read those citations and make their own opinions. They are also important because naming the people whose thoughts, ideas, beliefs, and work makes them visible. Often youth, working class people, folks with disabilities, who are trans* or people of Color rarely get the attention, support, and simple naming of their work that other folks receive. Our names are powerful and choosing not to name someone, or ignoring their name is a form of erasure. This happens too often, even within and among marginalized groups. 

Call For Papers: Black Paris: Place, Circulation, and the Mapping of Experiences

Call For Papers: Black Paris: Place, Circulation, and the Mapping of Experiences:

In France, the convergence of black experiences in Paris, following the 1950s-1960s massive migrations from the Caribbean and Africa, generated significant social and cultural practices, which, for most, have remained unknown to French people. Rather, the national collective imagination has been marked by striking, powerful and widely broadcasted images: the special forces violently evacuating African families who occupied Saint Bernard church and asked the government for long-term visas or, conversely, the victory of the “Black‐Blanc‐Beur” soccer team in 1998. These events made black people visible but their diversity was ignored. Yet, the social and human sciences did not fully seize the complexity of such histories and trajectories. Instead, scientific and public productions were - and are - fragmented into area and disciplinary studies and tend to produce a unified and homogenizing image of these populations. Some scholars like Pascal Blanchard and al. (2001) interrogated the representations of blackness in the French culture and criticized the enduring invisibility of blacks in French history. They brought to light the names of famous ones like René Maran who were left aside the national narrative. Developing a historical and political posture, they recollected pieces of the French past. Others, like Milena Doytcheva (2011), analyzed the role of ethnicity in urban public policies thus providing a valuable understanding of the tension between universalism and multiculturalism in the French context. From the late 1990s to the early 2000s, other studies on “diversity” came out, unveiling important social processes and mechanisms, but not opening to a true analysis putting “blackness” at the center. Similarly, blackness was not explored in connection with the city.

In our post-Black Atlantic world exploring creolization, the cultural, social and economic connections between Africa, America or the Caribbean, it no longer seems possible to consider black Paris only in its locality or solely in relation to French history. Rather, one should consider how black populations in Western societies - notably in European societies - imagine the city in connection with multiples scales intermingling American, African, European, Asian worlds so to represent their composite cultures and identities. Following these routes (Clifford: 1997), reflecting on black Paris implies showing how this cultural and social diversity is epitomized in the “city of light”.

The editors are seeking papers that examine black Paris through circulation, interaction and confrontation between people, cultures, identities and social practices. Contributors are encouraged to explore black Paris as a nexus of transcontinental cultural, identity, political and economic networks through a variety of perspectives, disciplines and fields including theoretical works, literary and cultural studies, the arts and popular culture, social and urban policies.

Call For Papers: Black Paris: Place, Circulation, and the Mapping of Experiences

Call For Papers: Black Paris: Place, Circulation, and the Mapping of Experiences:

In France, the convergence of black experiences in Paris, following the 1950s-1960s massive migrations from the Caribbean and Africa, generated significant social and cultural practices, which, for most, have remained unknown to French people. Rather, the national collective imagination has been marked by striking, powerful and widely broadcasted images: the special forces violently evacuating African families who occupied Saint Bernard church and asked the government for long-term visas or, conversely, the victory of the “Black‐Blanc‐Beur” soccer team in 1998. These events made black people visible but their diversity was ignored. Yet, the social and human sciences did not fully seize the complexity of such histories and trajectories. Instead, scientific and public productions were - and are - fragmented into area and disciplinary studies and tend to produce a unified and homogenizing image of these populations. Some scholars like Pascal Blanchard and al. (2001) interrogated the representations of blackness in the French culture and criticized the enduring invisibility of blacks in French history. They brought to light the names of famous ones like René Maran who were left aside the national narrative. Developing a historical and political posture, they recollected pieces of the French past. Others, like Milena Doytcheva (2011), analyzed the role of ethnicity in urban public policies thus providing a valuable understanding of the tension between universalism and multiculturalism in the French context. From the late 1990s to the early 2000s, other studies on “diversity” came out, unveiling important social processes and mechanisms, but not opening to a true analysis putting “blackness” at the center. Similarly, blackness was not explored in connection with the city.

In our post-Black Atlantic world exploring creolization, the cultural, social and economic connections between Africa, America or the Caribbean, it no longer seems possible to consider black Paris only in its locality or solely in relation to French history. Rather, one should consider how black populations in Western societies - notably in European societies - imagine the city in connection with multiples scales intermingling American, African, European, Asian worlds so to represent their composite cultures and identities. Following these routes (Clifford: 1997), reflecting on black Paris implies showing how this cultural and social diversity is epitomized in the “city of light”.

The editors are seeking papers that examine black Paris through circulation, interaction and confrontation between people, cultures, identities and social practices. Contributors are encouraged to explore black Paris as a nexus of transcontinental cultural, identity, political and economic networks through a variety of perspectives, disciplines and fields including theoretical works, literary and cultural studies, the arts and popular culture, social and urban policies.

Struggling To Be Heard: so-treu: emeraldtriangleprincess: ok I’m literally disgusted by all…

Struggling To Be Heard: so-treu: emeraldtriangleprincess: ok I’m literally disgusted by all...:

so-treu:

emeraldtriangleprincess:

ok I’m literally disgusted by all the ‘academic’ type anonymous bloggers who have been following POC on tumblr without ever introducing themselves and claim to be studying said POC *in general* (but are btw very suspicious-seeming and imply that…

cplong: The future is here. Are you ready? Re:Humanities ‘12:…



cplong:

The future is here. Are you ready?

Re:Humanities ‘12: March 29-30, 2012 sponsored by Bryn Mawr, Haverford, & Swarthmore Colleges. Re:Humanities is the only national digital humanities conference of, for, and by undergraduates. Supported by the three colleges and a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the conference invites undergraduate researchers to present original contributions to the developing field of digital humanities — applying traditional humanities questions to computing technologies, and vice versa.
The key is rooting it in rigorous humanities scholarship.

cplong: The future is here. Are you ready? Re:Humanities ‘12:…



cplong:

The future is here. Are you ready?

Re:Humanities ‘12: March 29-30, 2012 sponsored by Bryn Mawr, Haverford, & Swarthmore Colleges. Re:Humanities is the only national digital humanities conference of, for, and by undergraduates. Supported by the three colleges and a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the conference invites undergraduate researchers to present original contributions to the developing field of digital humanities — applying traditional humanities questions to computing technologies, and vice versa.
The key is rooting it in rigorous humanities scholarship.