Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr

Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr:

teachingtotransform:

edshelf:

In terms of classroom application, Tumblr would be a good way for you to share research for projects and assignments. Your students could then follow your Tumblr site and ‘reblog’ items into their personal site.

Or you could have students create multimedia (photos, videos, etc.) and post them onto their Tumblr. Then you could see how many views, likes, and reblogs each one gets. Could be a great way to encourage social media usage in schools using a free web 2.0 tool.

Finally, you could use it to connect with other teachers and education professionals. After just a few Tumblr searches and posts, you’ll find that people start coming out of the woodwork to ‘like’ your content and share it. You can quickly find fellow teachers and education-y folks by simply searching keywords like ‘teacher’ ‘edtech’ and so forth. When you find some good content, be sure to like it and reblog it. That person will then check your site out, start following your Tumblr, etc. Before you know it, you’ll have a whole new PLN on Tumblr!

I’m still not convinced on the best way to use Tumblr in the classroom, but I love it for finding teaching tools, ideas, and other teachers.

Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr

Why Teachers Should Try Out Tumblr:

teachingtotransform:

edshelf:

In terms of classroom application, Tumblr would be a good way for you to share research for projects and assignments. Your students could then follow your Tumblr site and ‘reblog’ items into their personal site.

Or you could have students create multimedia (photos, videos, etc.) and post them onto their Tumblr. Then you could see how many views, likes, and reblogs each one gets. Could be a great way to encourage social media usage in schools using a free web 2.0 tool.

Finally, you could use it to connect with other teachers and education professionals. After just a few Tumblr searches and posts, you’ll find that people start coming out of the woodwork to ‘like’ your content and share it. You can quickly find fellow teachers and education-y folks by simply searching keywords like ‘teacher’ ‘edtech’ and so forth. When you find some good content, be sure to like it and reblog it. That person will then check your site out, start following your Tumblr, etc. Before you know it, you’ll have a whole new PLN on Tumblr!

I’m still not convinced on the best way to use Tumblr in the classroom, but I love it for finding teaching tools, ideas, and other teachers.

How tech geeks in Africa are transforming IT education

How tech geeks in Africa are transforming IT education:

b-sama:

Failed by academia and constrained by convention, geeks are self-organising to equip themselves with the expertise and experience needed to solve social problems and enhance their personal development.

It is not just in the UK that ICT education has been found to be deficient - schools and colleges in many countries are failing to provide learners with the appropriate combination of technical and entrepreneurial skills that they need to convert skills into income and social change.

In resource-deprived settings like those in Zambia these problems are particularly acute especially when compounded by the added disadvantage of discrimination.

Zambia, like the UK, is awash with unemployed graduates. Lusaka, like other capital cities in the region, has far more IT graduates than tech jobs. Universities have done a poor job of equipping them with the appropriate mix of technical and entrepreneurial expertise that they need to feel confident developing their own businesses or securing the funding necessary to apply technology effectively to the development problems that they have identified in their communities.

Geeks are not all taking this lying down however; many are building social networks off-line and online to fill the gap left by deficient education. The recent boom in establishing technology innovation hubs across Africais one manifestation of this refusal to be defeated.

(read more)

Blackamazon is too much: GRad School

Blackamazon is too much: GRad School:

blackamazon:

So in the quest to get recommendations and tell you how I think, here are my areas of interest :

Black Diasporic Cultural production in globalization with a focus on gender and self publishing.

That leaves me with:

  • sociology
  • performance studies
  • communication
  • Af-Am
  • American Studies
  • DIgital…

Call for Volunteers

thearkhproject:

We’re looking for a writer to join our team!  If you have experience writing fiction and/or working in the games industry, we’d love for you to submit your experience to us at our e-mail: thearkhproject@gmail.com

The writers meet about 3-4 times per week for about 3 hours online, so if you have the time and the energy to join our team and contribute to the project, we’d love to hear from you!

"Electronic textbooks do offer substantial advantages over traditional printed text, such as the…"

“Electronic textbooks do offer substantial advantages over traditional printed text, such as the opportunity to make timely updates, adapt to learner preferences, and embed multimedia and learning activities—it’s one thing to read about the fall of the Berlin Wall, but it’s quite another to see a video of it. However, research shows that students likely do not interact with electronic textbooks as they do with traditional print, and the broader research base on multimedia learning indicates that considerable care must go into the design of special features to ensure that they augment learning rather than detract from it. There is no indication that publishers are investing the time and hard work required to leverage this information into a new generation of electronic textbooks. Rather, it seems that most are taking the pedagogical devices from print books and putting them in digital format, with little evidence that they positively affect learning.”

-

Fleeting Attention Shortchanges the Art of Patience - Chronicle of Higher Education

This article comes down hard on digital media for its tendency to shorten attention spans. The issue, however, of design, is critical. One can design digital pedagogical experiences to slow things down and to cultivate patience, attention to detail, and the habits of careful reading. But to do that, one needs to attend carefully to how pedagogical experiences are designed.  

One should not simply imprint print culture onto digital culture.  I talked a bit about this in this keynote address.

(via cplong)

Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior

Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior:

so-treu:

mohandasgandhi:

bbthity:

Paul K. Piffa, Daniel M. Stancatoa, Stéphane Côtéb, Rodolfo Mendoza-Dentona, Dacher Keltnera

Seven studies using experimental and naturalistic methods reveal that upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals. In studies 1 and 2, upper-class individuals were more likely to break the law while driving, relative to lower-class individuals. In follow-up laboratory studies, upper-class individuals were more likely to exhibit unethical decision-making tendencies (study 3), take valued goods from others (study 4), lie in a negotiation (study 5), cheat to increase their chances of winning a prize (study 6), and endorse unethical behavior at work (study 7) than were lower-class individuals. Mediator and moderator data demonstrated that upper-class individuals’ unethical tendencies are accounted for, in part, by their more favorable attitudes toward greed.

“Ethics is subjective” anyway.

And that’s study # 5,023 with this conclusion….

this is my not surprised face.

Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior

Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior:

so-treu:

mohandasgandhi:

bbthity:

Paul K. Piffa, Daniel M. Stancatoa, Stéphane Côtéb, Rodolfo Mendoza-Dentona, Dacher Keltnera

Seven studies using experimental and naturalistic methods reveal that upper-class individuals behave more unethically than lower-class individuals. In studies 1 and 2, upper-class individuals were more likely to break the law while driving, relative to lower-class individuals. In follow-up laboratory studies, upper-class individuals were more likely to exhibit unethical decision-making tendencies (study 3), take valued goods from others (study 4), lie in a negotiation (study 5), cheat to increase their chances of winning a prize (study 6), and endorse unethical behavior at work (study 7) than were lower-class individuals. Mediator and moderator data demonstrated that upper-class individuals’ unethical tendencies are accounted for, in part, by their more favorable attitudes toward greed.

“Ethics is subjective” anyway.

And that’s study # 5,023 with this conclusion….

this is my not surprised face.