jmjohnso: Adventures with Skitch x A screenshot of a…



jmjohnso:

Adventures with Skitch x A screenshot of a handwritten note I took while reading Christina Sharpe’s Monstrous Intimacies.  Thanks to Skitch, this image is annotated.  It also lives here.  Thanks to Evernote, this screenshot is OCRd and searchable.  Thanks to Sharpe, Douglass reminds us that slavery turns on a pivot of violence and intimacy, the one wrapped tightly around the other.

For more on using Skitch see Profhacker’s review here

If you are using Skitch, how do you like it?  And how are you using it (classroom, research, casual reading or note-taking)? 

Click here to read the rest of Douglass’s speech. 

ONGOING DATABASE THAT DEPICTS WHEN AND WHERE UNARMED POC WERE KILLED BY AUTHORITY FIGURES

ONGOING DATABASE THAT DEPICTS WHEN AND WHERE UNARMED POC WERE KILLED BY AUTHORITY FIGURES:

bankuei:

icecreamritual:

REBLOG AND SUPPORT

It took me a second to see “Since 2012” b/c I was like, “I KNOW THERE’S MORE THAN THIS”.

secondlina: BY DEMAND – TOP “GIRLY” 10 COMICS THAT DON’T SUCK…



secondlina:

BY DEMAND - TOP “GIRLY” 10 COMICS THAT DON’T SUCK FOR PRE-TEEN GIRLS

(According to me)

These are a list of comics I consider to have for primary market young girls. I excluded anything unisex (like Amulet) or that has dudes as a main market but can be read, and are often adored, by girls (aka shonen manga).

Also, i’m French. Expect french in here.

#1 - LOU! - French series about a creative girl and her single mom. The mom is a fantasy writer and obsessed by video games. Lou, the daughter, dreams of being a fashion designer or a poet. The cast is original and multicultural, representing different styles of today’s youth. And every book focuses on an issue that matches Lou’s age, since she gains a year with every book (like Harry Potter). I love book 3, who focuses strongly on depression. There’s a TV show, but the books are superior by far, since the show is stuck in status quo land. 

#2 - Re-gifters - Fantastic story about Dixie, a second-generation Korean immigration and a martial arts student who has unfortunately lost her focus (aka ki) due to a big, big doom crush. She needs to digest the crush and find a way to win the big competition. This is short, sweet, all about the troubles of being a confused teen and an immigrant. Brilliant. 

#3 - The Yoko Tsuno series - Pretty much one of the only unsexualized female comic hero I had as a kid, Yoko is a science-fiction-slash-police-drama series. This woman went to space. She played with ghosts. And robots. AND GHOST ROBOTS. 

#4 - Friends with boys by Faith Erin Hicks - Man, does this comic even need an introduction? I’m in love with it.

#5 - Anya’s Ghost - Anya is a russian immigrant who feels fat, silly, and generally hates everyone. Everything changes when she falls down a well and meets a ghost down there. They become best friends… up until the ghost starts living vicariously thru her with way too much passion. 

#6 - Gunnerkrigg court - Technically, a webcomic, but since the books exist, it’s fully possible for me to push it unto schools. I get the feeling this story is unisex most of the time, but a couple of details push it in the girl territory, for me. Amazing webcomics about two friends in a strange school…

#7 - Card Captor Sakura - Short magical girl series by Clamp… it’s pretty much all about awesome spells and acceptance. Me likey. 

#8 - Elinor Jones - In victorian times, a girl wants to become a seamstress for the renown house of Tiffany. But the work is hard, and the girl suffers from body image issues and eating disorders. Lots of pretty dresses, cool characters and important issues explored very nicely. 

#9 - Princesse Sara - Based on the book “Little Princess”, it’s a steampunk retelling of the classic Cinderella tale.

#10 - Smile - Raina gets braces. We all remember how much that sucks.

* End of the list, please reblog and ADD. Once I removed the “unisex” or “guy but can be read by girls” stuff, it was actually pretty difficult to compile this list. Go figure. 

Diaspora Hypertext: Tea Party Groups In Tennessee Demand Textbooks Overlook U.S. Founder’s Slave-Owning History

Diaspora Hypertext: Tea Party Groups In Tennessee Demand Textbooks Overlook U.S. Founder's Slave-Owning History:

theybc:

A little more than a year after the conservative-led state board of education in Texas approved massive changes to its school textbooks to put slavery in a more positive light, a group of Tea Party activists in Tennessee has renewed its push to whitewash school textbooks. The…

The Future of Civil War Era Studies: Slavery and Capitalism

The Future of Civil War Era Studies: Slavery and Capitalism:

The relationship of slavery and capitalism looms over nineteenth-century historiography. Scholars still debate how to label slaveholders who presented themselves as market-averse paternalists while nonetheless producing the nation’s most valuable export crop and relentlessly transforming human beings into commodities. Likewise, historians continue to argue over the timing and extent of a market revolution that brought wage labor, market production, and cash exchange to some (but scarcely all) regions of the North. Few explanations for the coming of the Civil War are more durable than those pitting a capitalist North against a slaveholding (and thus presumptively anticapitalist) South. However, such “clash of civilizations” accounts are harder to sustain as we learn more about economic structures and cultures in both sections as well as about their commercial interconnectedness in the decades before 1860.

Slavery and capitalism were deeply entangled with one another as the United States grew into an economic power in the nineteenth century, yet we still know far too little about these entanglements. Two things become very clear almost immediately. First, to understand technological innovation, entrepreneurship, speculation, sanctified property rights, and market integration in the nineteenth-century United States, it is necessary to take Mississippi and South Carolina as seriously as Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Second, slavery was indispensible to national economic development, as access to slave-grown commodities and to markets in slave-agriculture regions proved essential to the lives and livelihoods of Americans far removed from the plantation South.

By connecting the stories of New York financiers, Virginia slaves, Connecticut shipbuilders, and Alabama land speculators,historians have made slavery central to the history of capitalism. In an age of industry predicated on the transformation of slave-grown cotton into textiles, the plantation and the factory must necessarily be discussed together rather than separately. In the blur of commodities and capital that flowed between regions, it becomes far harder to locate the boundary between a capitalist North and a slave South, with consequences for how we understand North and South as discrete economies—and whether we should do so in the first place.