nefepants: gallowsfoo: grindrella: spacedrinks: HOLY SHIT…



nefepants:

gallowsfoo:

grindrella:

spacedrinks:

HOLY SHIT THIS IS HUGE

i don’t know why everyone is so obsessed with the zombie apocalypse when the robot war is a real and looming threat

fooexe
Good news Your world is becoming real

Basically they got three robots, told them that two of them were given “dumbing pills”, and they asked one which pill it was given.

The robot of course wasn’t sure if it had or hadn’t yet and said “I don’t know”, but after it looked at the other silent robots (who were actually unable to speak from the start), it realized that its fully functional, and then was finally able to say “I know now.”

It can assess itself and its behavior in relation to other robots and people. It can make that differentiation between “me” and “I”, and understand that it is an individual.

People are shrugging this off, but this is a similar self-awareness test to how people put mirrors in front of animals to see if it treats the reflection like another animal or treat it like a reflection.

eshusplayground: typette: this movie was super cute but like,…









eshusplayground:

typette:

this movie was super cute but like, from a technological standpoint:

the characters in this film displayed some of the most advanced and properly weighted/driven topology I’ve seen on the big screen. Not even pixar gets this shit right. She has no over exaggerated nasolabial folds on her cheeks that betray the type of cookie-cutter reused topology that pixar and the like seem to swear by, as their “house style”. The rigging was glorious, and best of all, the common issue with characters necks meeting their heads at an inappropriate angle, where the bend takes place BEHIND the neck and not where the neck meets the skull- like a doll- has fucking bugged me forever and THEY FINALLY FIXED IT

THIS CHARACTER, SHE IS PERFECT and now that it can be demonstrated as workable in feature film, I don’t know why the hell it isn’t more common, Dreamworks is absolutely destroying it in the animation/modeling/rigging category. DESTROYING the competition.

Look at her hands! Look at how the edges of her mouth come to a point but never crease the geo!! Look at how fucking perfect her hair is! They fixed the gap between eyelashes and the sclera surface which annoys me sooooo much too. All these little things and they totally nailed every one!

such a beautiful movie.

And I love her cute round face. Round face, like a child, not that weird geometic shit they do in, ahem, OTHER animation studios.

How Independence Day Clothing Is Reinventing the Way Children With Autism Get Dressed

How Independence Day Clothing Is Reinventing the Way Children With Autism Get Dressed:

bonesandblood-sunandmoon:

faircatch:

image
image
image

Clothing that can be worn backwards, frontwards, inside out…  It is an alternative for Autistic youths - it has no tags or seams and won’t cause issues because it will be on correctly, no matter how they are put on.
Spread the word!
http://www.independencedayclothing.com/#!shop/c1ylq

holdingthebowl

How Independence Day Clothing Is Reinventing the Way Children With Autism Get Dressed

How Independence Day Clothing Is Reinventing the Way Children With Autism Get Dressed:

bonesandblood-sunandmoon:

faircatch:

image
image
image

Clothing that can be worn backwards, frontwards, inside out…  It is an alternative for Autistic youths - it has no tags or seams and won’t cause issues because it will be on correctly, no matter how they are put on.
Spread the word!
http://www.independencedayclothing.com/#!shop/c1ylq

holdingthebowl

lowcountrydigitallibrary: Little known fact- the Lowcountry…



lowcountrydigitallibrary:

Little known fact- the Lowcountry Digital Libraries have a number of oral histories in our collections!

Photograph: Mary Moultrie.

Oral History: Mary Moultrie, William Saunders, Rosetta Simmons, Interview by Kerry Taylor, 5 March 2009.

“For over three months in 1969, four hundred African-American hospital workers from the Medical College of South Carolina and Charleston County Hospital walked off their jobs in protest over discrimination and the right to form a union. The state government and hospital boards argued that workers receiving pay from public funds could not engage in collective bargaining. The hospital strikers were mostly women, some of whom earned below the federal minimum wage; white hospital workers performing the same jobs were paid higher. This interview details the experiences of two women involved in the strike, Mary Moultrie and Rosetta Simmons, and a local civil rights activist who helped organize the strike, William Saunders. Moultrie and Simmons describe the working conditions before the strike and their demand for “respect as human beings.” Saunders remembers the racial tension in the city during the strike, detailing threats made by local officials and the false arrests of activists. All three interviewees report that African Americans at the hospital today are “afraid” to push for better pay and working conditions. Saunders also comments on the fact that “nothing is illegal in South Carolina,” referring to the fact that the state continues to deny public sector workers the right to collectively bargain. The session, which took place at the office of the union representing City workers (Local 1199-Charleston), was part of a Citadel graduate course on local history. Citadel history professor Kerry Taylor guided the initial portion of the conversation and various students followed with their own questions. For additional interviews related to the hospital workers strike, visit the Southern Oral History Program collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Avery Research Center at the College of Charleston.”

Photograph from The Citadel Photograph Collection.

Oral History from The Citadel Oral History Program.

Both collections are held by The Citadel Archives and Museum.