In defense of transforming DH

In defense of transforming DH:

 But #transformDH suggests, to my mind rightly, that the jolt of the oppositional can be powerful, when it is rooted in a critical activism that builds on the little-t theories that have preceded and exist alongside it, rather than manifesting as nerdy beleagueredness.** Germano reflects that “[s]omeone once remarked to me that scholarly publishing in gay studies was a conflict between the nerdy and the naughty.” This conflict seems to me to have re-emerged in #transformDH’s invocation of oppositional rhetorics, in a way that I believe to be productive. Sometimes we need collaboration, and sometimes we need solidarity. And perhaps even such fine adjustments require some transformation in the way we understand our work.

"…one of these, is not like the others." – By Natalia Cecire

"...one of these, is not like the others." - By Natalia Cecire:

I’m sure you see where I’m going with this. The perverse notion that the most established and privileged people in the field are a precious indigenous culture whose tacit knowledge the colonizing discourse-wielders (who happen to be disproportionately female, brown, queer) cannot possibly appreciate is a prime example of nerdiness serving as a place for white men to feel embattled.

Let’s be clear. The fact that you build things that other people have trouble understanding does not make you similar to Native Americans at the moment of colonization. At all.


-Natalia Cecire

Black Girls Code

Black Girls Code:

This is kind of my favorite thing ever.

BlackGirlsCode was founded by Kimberly Bryant a Biotechnology/Engineering professional who received her first taste of computer programming as a freshman in Electrical Engineering back when Fortran and Pascal were still the popular languages for newbies in the computing world and the ‘Apple Macintosh’ was the new kid on the block.   Kimberly decided to launch BlackGirlsCode to meet the needs of young women of color who are underrepresented in the currently exploding field of technology.  Much has changed since those days and the mission of BlackGirlsCode is to introduce programming and technology to a new generation of coders who will become the leaders and creators of tomorrow.  Our goal:  Build the Future 

Introducing the Crowdsourced Book Review: "Race After The Internet"

Introducing the Crowdsourced Book Review: "Race After The Internet":

Book Cover for Race After the Internet

We’ve dubbed this project a “Crowdsourced Book Review” as a nod towards its collective nature. HASTAC Scholars were invited to review one chapter each, and then collectively comment on each other’s reviews once they are posted. All peer comments, questions and suggestions will be in the public comments on this site. We’d welcome your feedback too!

The reviewers are all from different universities, at different points in their academic career, and work in different disciplines. Some of these reviews are fairly personal engagements with the chapter in question, while others are more of a ‘report’ of the chapter’s content. There were no constraints placed on the style or content of the reviews.

We heartily welcome other reviewers to join this collection! If you’d like to add your own review, please post it as a blog on this site, and message me (Fiona Barnett, Director of HASTAC Scholars) with the link, so that I can add you to the list below.

This is such an important book, and it comes at an especially important time. We hope that by highlighting these engaging, innovative and thoughtful projects, that you will be inspired to read, learn & teach this book in the future. 

In the meantime, jump in with comments, questions & your own reviews!