stitch-n-time: hauntedfalcon: micdotcom: Watch: There are…





















stitch-n-time:

hauntedfalcon:

micdotcom:

Watch: There are some horrible stereotypes about curvy shoppers out there — these women are proving them wrong.

In collaboration with @fedex

I started crying while watching the video, and then I went to the website and saw this selection of checkboxes:

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COMFORTABLE. NOT CONFIDENT. THIS IS HOW YOU FUCKING DO IT.

Because the link isn’t on this post yet…

This might be kind of useful.

Tanya DePass Talks With Dark Matters About #INeedDiverseGames and More…

darkmattersproj:

Tanya DePass Talks With Dark Matters About #INeedDiverseGames and More…

@cypheroftyr has no idea we are posting about her today so keep it on the low. This truly lovely and revolutionary blerdgirl would never brag on herself, so in case you have no idea who she is, here’s what matters. @cypheroftyr is a secret superhero. She has been tweeting since 2008 and serves as a @GaymerX diversity liaison, EIC of @OutofTokensCast, and co-host at @ChromaticLifeFM. Her…

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refinery29: Watch The Founder of Girls Who Code Perfectly…



















refinery29:

Watch The Founder of Girls Who Code Perfectly School Trevor Noah On Why Culture Makes Or Breaks Women In Tech

On The Daily Show with Trevor Noah guest Reshma Saujani, an Indian-American lawyer and politician, discussed the initiative to encourage young women and girls to pursue studies and careers the booming tech field, where they are falling behind. But there are two moments in a girl’s life where we can reverse the trend.

Gifs: The Daily Show/cc.com

Winnipegger starts Facebook safe rides group for aboriginal women

Winnipegger starts Facebook safe rides group for aboriginal women:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Jackie Traverse decided she had to do something after hearing story after story about aboriginal women dealing with racism or rude behaviour in Winnipeg taxis.

Traverse, an artist, turned to social media, creating “Boycott all Winnipeg Taxi Companies” and “Ikwe (Women helping women safe ride)” pages on Facebook on the weekend.

Ikwe is a ride-sharing group that so far has close to a dozen women signed up to give rides.

Traverse said she’s had her own issues with cab drivers, and she’s heard more and more stories from other aboriginal women.

“They’re rude to us, they demand payment as soon as we sit in or they yell at us, they think we don’t have money. They feel we’re all trying to rob them or ditch out on the cabs,” said Traverse, 46.

Crystal Anderson said she, too, has had similarly racially-charged experiences taking cabs in Winnipeg. Anderson signed up to be a volunteer driver with the group because she wants to provide indigenous women with an added sense of safety.

“Some of these women don’t have help, so I want to just pass it on, pay it forward and let them know that there is people out there [who] care,” she said.

Continue Reading.

nitro-nova: Alright, so /u/SexyCyborg is officially my favorite…











nitro-nova:

Alright, so /u/SexyCyborg is officially my favorite computer engineer. You’ll find her typically working on tech-infused fashion projects, including the post on her LED skirt from before. This time, she becomes a Shadowrunner. Well, specifically, a pentester, according to her, but Shadowrunner sounds way cooler so

I’ve been watching the TV show “Mr. Robot” and while I know not all of it is accurate some of it is and it got me curious. I’m already pretty comfortable with command line and remote server administration from my web development work, and it turns out a lot of ‘hacking’ tools are just testing tools any sensible IT professional would use- just without a GUI.

So I spent this month hitting the books (well web pages) watching lots of videos and learning a bit about information security and penetration testing (I wonder how many idiot jokes that phrase is going to cause…). I still don’t know much, but I know a tiny bit more than I did. Enough to ask people who know more than me the right questions- and enough for a fun project.

So I got to thinking- if I had to do penetration testing on a corporate facility, how would I do it? Social engineering for one- I’m a natural honeypot. I think there’s a reasonable chance that a guy might invite me back to their office after a few drinks in the neighborhood? :-P But a handbag would be suspicious and leaving cell phones at the gate would be standard practice in any reasonably secure facility. My typical clothing does not leave room to hide anything- but that’s all the more reason they would not be suspicious of me.

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So I devised the Wu Ying Shoes (无影鞋)! - Penetration Testing Platform Heels!  "Wu Ying" means “shadowless", the name is from the folk hero Wong Fei Hung’s (黄飞鸿) famous “shadowless kick” (无影脚). Wong Fei Hung is from Foshan, which is my ancestral home as well as the ancestral home of Bruce Lee. As legend has it, to execute the “shadowless kick” Wong would distract his opponent with a punch or upper body move while striking with his foot.

With my shadowless shoes I distract the target with my…upper body and they don’t see the real danger on my feet :-) Also I get tired of English names for everything. If we are ever going to stop copying Western things we should stop copying Western names as well right? So “Wu Ying Shoes”.

Each shoe has a drawer that can be slid out without my having to take the shoes off. This drawer can be customized for various payloads. (Just FYI- of course I asked the staff for spray and a cloth to wipe off the table carefully after I took these pictures).

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For the purposes of this first test version, my right shoe contains a pen testing drop box.

This is a wireless router running OpenWRT with a built in rechargeable battery that could either be left running inside the shoe (for war-walking, wifi sniffing and logging etc) or could be removed and plugged into a convenient open network jack as soon as I was inside and had direct access to the LAN. Once this is done you can gain remote access anytime you want via SSH tunnel.

Installing OpenWRT on the TL-MR10U is just like upgrading the firmware on any router. It’s two links and a button- nothing to it. There’s a lot of different software you can run once you have OpenWRT flashed. This router may-or-may-not be running a custom version of Wispi for the TP-Link TL-MR10U because if it was it would probably be illegal in China so maybe it’s not. But if it was I could run Jasager/Karma which lets you fake being a friendly/known wifi access point and setup a fake login page to capture passwords, among other cool tricks. Wispi also has a few other handy utilities that you should never use in the real world but are pretty cool to try at home once or twice just so you know how.

In my left shoe there is a USB keystroke recorder. This is a pass-through device that goes into the back of the computer where you normally plug the keyboard in and records everything typed on the keyboard (so all passwords) in it’s built in memory. [There’s also] a basic lock pick set for gaining access to network cabinets, file drawers etc. I learned how to use the picks at a Locksport meet-up. I can only do simple locks but still loads of fun! Like little metal puzzles…

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I had to print [the shoes] at 0.3mm so the layers are a little coarse. It was taking forever at 0.2mm (what I did my LED skirt control box at). Still looks decent. That’s PLA plastic. Infill is 20% and it supports my weight without any issues. Each shoe weighs about the same as a normal, non-printed shoe. Source files are here if you’d like to make your own: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:980191

LibraryBox can be a good way to share movies and ebooks with friends if you are traveling or don’t have wifi. I could see Piratebox being useful in time of disaster for sharing information when the wireless networks are down. It’s kind of like a mini-NAS.

Wispi and Pentest drop boxes should of course should only be experimented with at home for educational purposes. While it’s good to know about this stuff always obey your local laws. People think all sorts of crazy stuff about China and I don’t want to talk politics- but my city Shenzhen is a really, really cool place to live (think Blade Runner) so there’s really no reason to do dumb stuff.

As always- thanks to my friends for helping to clean up my English above. I had a ton of technical help but I follow a strict “don’t do it for me, show me how” rule so learned a tremendous amount. As I’ve also mentioned before, I’m not much more technical than my female friends but I am patient, good at following tutorials and and asking questions. If you can follow a recipe I assure you that you could do this sort of thing also.

Any women with questions about teaching themselves online should feel free to contact me on Reddit and I’d be delighted to offer any help I can. Remember ladies- if you are thinking about becoming a Maker, learning to code or doing hardware; if a girl who looks like me can do it, how hard can it really be? :-p

gjmueller: upworthy: If your nude photos are posted online…



gjmueller:

upworthy:

If your nude photos are posted online without your permission, Microsoft and Google want to know.

For years, most victims of revenge porn — people who have had their nude photos shared online without permission — basically couldn’t do anything about it.

According to one study, over 50% of all adults engage in sexting, and 70% admit to having received a nude photo online or over the phone.

And yet, despite the fact that we all (or at least more than half of us) do it, there’s still this weird, persistent, harmful notion that if your naked pictures get leaked or shared maliciously by an ex online, it’s your fault for taking them in the first place.

It’s completely backward, but sadly, the law seems to at least kind of agree.

As of September 2014, New Republic found, putting someone else’s illicit photos online without their consent was illegal in just 16 states, though laws have been proposed in more states. Not only is it typically impossible to prosecute the perpetrator, they note, it’s impossible to legally compel websites to take the images taken down most of the time.

But thankfully, Microsoft and Google — which operate two of the biggest search engines on the web — don’t think it’s your fault. And they’re finally saying “Enough is enough.”

Here’s how to report a non-consensual image posting on Bing.

And here’s how to do it on Google.