computatiohumanitatis: Talk: Alan Liu, “The Meaning of Digital…



computatiohumanitatis:

Talk: Alan Liu, “The Meaning of Digital Humanities”

Talk to be given on October 11, 2012, 4:30 PM

Location: FHI Garage - C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, Duke University, 114 S. Buchanan Ave., Durham, NC 27708

In a talk responding to a request by PMLA, Alan Liu charts the internal trends in the Digital Humanities, including a reading of a state-of-the-art work of text mining.  He also considers the Digital Humanities as a register of the major difficulties for the humanities in general in society today.  

Alan Liu is Professor and Chair of the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  He is the author of the The Laws of Cool:  Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information, and Local Transcendence:  Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database, among other books.  His work has been recognized by an NEH Fellowship, an ACLS Fellowship, and numerous grants. 

Introduction by Timothy W. Lenoir, Professor and primary Kimberly Jenkins Chair for New Technologies and Society.

Co-sponsored by the National Humanities Center, Franklin Humanities Institute, the Literature Program and the English Department at Duke University. (See The Meaning of Digital Humanities | HASTAC.)

Facebook’s Instagram Changes May Exploit Teen Content

Facebook's Instagram Changes May Exploit Teen Content:

teachingtotransform:

Facebook Inc.’s Instagram policy changes, announced yesterday, may let advertisers use teenagers’ photos for marketing, raising privacy and security concerns, said Jeffrey Chester, executive director for the Center for Digital Democracy.

The new policies, which now apply to users as young as 13, enable Instagram, a photo-sharing service that Facebook bought in August, to use members’ names, text, photos and other content with marketing messages, the company said on its site. The new terms of use, set to take effect next month, could be exploitative, Chester said.

Such a trip. No boundaries anymore.

Epistolary Ennui: Digital Humanities Projects – History, Culture, Memory

Epistolary Ennui: Digital Humanities Projects - History, Culture, Memory:

epistolary-ennui:

Digital humanities projects are a recently revived interest of mine, in part from an article I read: Alan Liu & William Thomas, ‘Humanities in the Digital Age’.

Combining aesthetic and functional presentation with well researched information (either digitally born or represented digitally) is…

computatiohumanitatis: Postdocs: University of Southern…



computatiohumanitatis:

Postdocs: University of Southern California: Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholars in the Humanities. 

Deadline: Thursday, November 15, 2012

Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholars play a pivotal part in fostering the strengths of the humanities at USC, linking the expertise of USC faculty and doctoral students with the knowledge and insights gained from their own research and scholarship.

These appointments are for two years, and begin in August of the academic year to which candidates are appointed.  Provost’s scholars will teach three courses over four semesters, with one semester free for full-time research. The salary for Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholars is $50,000 per year plus fringe benefits, with a research and travel account of $6,000 per year.

To apply, please visit: https://postdocs.usc.edu/apply/

(via H-Net Job Guide)

glossylalia: serotonical: nor-ton: philk: The VIP Fridge…



glossylalia:

serotonical:

nor-ton:

philk:

The VIP Fridge Magnet from Dubai’s Red Tomato Pizza allows customers to order their favourite pizza at the touch of a button. Members of the loyalty program were sent free magnets, which use a smartphone’s Bluetooth functionality to connect to the Internet. Once customers have pressed the button on the magnet, the pizza is delivered to their registered address.

pizza button

no one man should have all that power.

Yes I will have all the mushroom all the time

Jesus Christ, I love the future.

leftofblack: Left of Black S3:E4 | October 8,…



leftofblack:

Left of Black S3:E4 | October 8, 2012

‘Revolutionary’ Black Women & the Musical Life & Death of a Chocolate City

Left of Black, host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Professor Lakesia D. Johnson, author of  Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman (Baylor University Press) and longtime Washington, D.C. based journalist, Dr. Natalie Hopkinson, author of Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City (Duke University Pres, 2012).

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

***

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

leftofblack: Left of Black S3:E4 | October 8,…



leftofblack:

Left of Black S3:E4 | October 8, 2012

‘Revolutionary’ Black Women & the Musical Life & Death of a Chocolate City

Left of Black, host and Duke Professor Mark Anthony Neal is joined via Skype by Professor Lakesia D. Johnson, author of  Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman (Baylor University Press) and longtime Washington, D.C. based journalist, Dr. Natalie Hopkinson, author of Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City (Duke University Pres, 2012).

***

Left of Black is a weekly Webcast hosted by Mark Anthony Neal and produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center at Duke University.

***

Episodes of Left of Black are also available for free download in  @ iTunes U

U.S. Military Secretly Sprayed Radiation On Predominately Black Neighborhoods

U.S. Military Secretly Sprayed Radiation On Predominately Black Neighborhoods:

anarcho-queer:

A college professor from St. Louis, Missouri has released research claiming that the U.S. Army conducted secret Cold War tests by spraying toxic radioactive chemicals on cities like St. Louis and Corpus Christi.

St. Louis Community College-Meramec sociology professor Lisa Martino-Taylor told The Associated Press that her research showed that the Army may have sprayed radioactive particles with zinc cadmium sulfide while claiming that it was testing a smoke screen that could prevent Russians from observing St. Louis from the air.

Those tests were concentrated in predominately-black areas of the city, which Army documents called “a densely populated slum district.

In 1994, the Army confirmed to Congress that St. Louis was chosen because it resembled Russian cities that the U.S. might have to attack with biological weapons.

The study was secretive for reason,” Martino-Taylor explained to KDSK last month. “They didn’t have volunteers stepping up and saying yeah, I’ll breathe zinc cadmium sulfide with radioactive particles.

Documents showed that the Army used airplanes to drop the chemicals in Corpus Christi, but sprayers were mounted on station wagons and buildings in St. Louis.

It was pretty shocking. The level of duplicity and secrecy. Clearly they went to great lengths to deceive people,” Martino-Taylor observed. “This was a violation of all medical ethics, all international codes, and the military’s own policy at that time.

There is a lot of evidence that shows people in St. Louis and the city, in particular minority communities, were subjected to military testing that was connected to a larger radiological weapons testing project.

Doris Spates lived in one of those impoverished St. Louis neighborhoods as a child and has survived cervical cancer. But four of her siblings and her father weren’t as lucky. All five have died of cancer.

I’m wondering if it got into our system,” Spates told the AP. “When I heard about the testing, I thought, ‘Oh my God. If they did that, there’s no telling what else they’re hiding.’”

Last month, both Missouri Sens. Claire McCaskill (D) and Roy Blunt (R) demanded that Army Secretary John McHugh come clean about the testing. For its part, the Army refused to comment on the matter until it had responded to the senators, the AP reported.

Maurice Mbikayi | Untitled, 2010 “Maurice Mbikayi was born in…



Maurice Mbikayi | Untitled, 2010

Maurice Mbikayi was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1974. He attended the Academies des Beaux Arts and graduated with a diploma in Graphic Design and visual communication in 2000, then decided to expand his horizons and moved to South Africa in mid-2004. In 2010 he participated in the Hollard Exchange Program facilitated by the Spier Arts Academy in Cape Town.”

via ladyfreshderica