myimaginarybrooklyn: Dilemmas of the Digital Humanists Armed…



myimaginarybrooklyn:

Dilemmas of the Digital Humanists

Armed with computers, humanities scholars have been performing once-unimaginable feats. They have recreated early modern London and American Civil War battlefields with the help of geospatial imaging. They have trawled, or “text-mined”, the vast corpus of Google-digitized books to establish how many times certain words or linguistic patterns appear. They have created a searchable database of almost 198,000 trials held at the Old Bailey between 1674 and 1913 (www.oldbaileyonline.org). They have mapped the Republic of Letters by tracing the journeys of 50,000 letters written and received by Voltaire, Locke, Franklin and other seventeenth- and eighteenth-century luminaries (https://republicofletters.stanford.edu/www.oldbaileyonline.org). They have mapped the Republic of Letters by tracing the journeys of 50,000 letters written and received by Voltaire, Locke, Franklin and other seventeenth- and eighteenth-century luminaries (https://republicofletters.stanford.edu/).

All this falls under the expansive label “digital humanities”. Humanities computing dates back decades but has taken on a new lustre lately. The list of digital editions and visualizations and experiments grows and grows as the tools become more sophisticated and the datasets larger. Funding agencies such as JISC (formerly the Joint Information Systems Committee) and the National Endowment for the Humanities have created grant programmes to support such work. The New York Times has documented some of the most eye-catching work in its “Humanities 2.0” series. No wonder that William Pannapacker, an English professor and blogger for The Chronicle of Higher Education (my employer), described the digital humanities as “the next big thing”.

That was in 2009, the year in which digital humanists (as they are often called) stole the spotlight at the annual conference of the Modern Language Association (MLA). One might have expected them to sit back, let the algorithms run, and bask in the glow of attention. But success, it seems, breeds its own set of worries. By 2011, Pannapacker was fretting publicly that the digital humanities had become so fashionable that they had given in to cliquishness. At the MLA gathering that year, Stephen Ramsay, an associate professor of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, gave a deliberately provocative talk arguing that true digital humanists build things – by which he meant things such as software programs for computers. “Do you have to know how to code?”, he asked. “I’m a tenured professor of digital humanities and I say yes.”

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jasonmkelly: On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital…



jasonmkelly:

On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital Humanities and Digital History to a group of new Public History graduate students.  I’m assuming that they know little to nothing of digital humanities.  So, I thought that I would summarize what digital humanities looks like as a practice when graphed against developments in web technologies (with which I assume they are more familiar).  The graph is not meant to be definitive, nor is it meant to summarize my own views about the trajectory (good, bad, or otherwise) of DH.  Rather, it’s meant to summarize some predominant ideas in the field as well as to provide some avenues for reflection on the relationship technology and scholarship.  I would be very interested in any suggestions.  Thanks.  Jason.   

jasonmkelly: On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital…



jasonmkelly:

On Thursday, I’m giving a talk on Digital Humanities and Digital History to a group of new Public History graduate students.  I’m assuming that they know little to nothing of digital humanities.  So, I thought that I would summarize what digital humanities looks like as a practice when graphed against developments in web technologies (with which I assume they are more familiar).  The graph is not meant to be definitive, nor is it meant to summarize my own views about the trajectory (good, bad, or otherwise) of DH.  Rather, it’s meant to summarize some predominant ideas in the field as well as to provide some avenues for reflection on the relationship technology and scholarship.  I would be very interested in any suggestions.  Thanks.  Jason.   

Article: Minecraft addition, says mom — Slate magazine.

Article: Minecraft addition, says mom — Slate magazine.:

glowstone:

As a researcher examining the potential of technology in education and as the mother of two Minecraft-obsessed girls in elementary school, I have an acute love-hate relationship with this game.”

Digital Doyennes: My New Social Everything Tool

Digital Doyennes: My New Social Everything Tool:

digitaldoyennes:

Thank you Quora the best social netork in all the interland for introducing me to IFTTT. As a creative person I have zero actually working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, or math, therefore, if this then that didn’t mean that much to me until I found this site and realized I could tell my social…

If you’re in Atlanta October 13 or nearby #womensinteractive will be well worth your time. Peep the lineup http://t.co/DHVzmZTE

If you're in Atlanta October 13 or nearby #womensinteractive will be well worth your time. Peep the lineup http://t.co/DHVzmZTE:

digitaldoyennes:

imaginando: The Politics of Hmong Studies Professoriate

imaginando: The Politics of Hmong Studies Professoriate:

kongpha:

The University of Wisconsin - Madison is now going to be hiring a new professor in Hmong-American Studies. The last time UWM decided to hire a person doing research in Hmong Studies, things did not end up so well. Ian Baird, a geographer, was ultimately hired into the Department of…